Download Lead Qualification 2012: Call Don’t Click?

Telephone - Cold Calling, with a TwistWildfire and EdgeRank Checker held an excellent webinar on Facebook EdgeRank earlier this week to share tips on Facebook engagement gleaned from studying 60,000 brand pages and more than 1 million Facebook posts.

The PDF link for the first chapter of the related report, “EdgeRank and Your Brand: An Analysis of Messaging Engagement on Facebook by Business Category” arrived free as promised via easy to forward newsletter-style email from the “Wildfire Team” shortly after the webinar.

Webinars, Phone Calls & Lead Generation 2012

The webinar follow-up email also included instructions for obtaining the full report free, too:

Call Wildfire at (888) 859-4750

Call to Receive the Full EdgeRank Report

At first, I rankled. Call them… for a FREE report? Suddenly the report didn’t feel very free any more. And yet — when I did call, there was no pressure sales techniques. The nice man on the phone simply asked for my email address, something Wildfire already had. It wasn’t even a tricky way to get my telephone number – they had that from the original webinar sign-up.

So why bother with forcing the telephone call to get the report? Here’s my take: It’s a positive twist on what I’ve increasingly seen others do — move quickly to a phone contact after a webinar. Before now, though, I’d seen brands like PRWeb use interruption marketing, calling attendees with thinly disguised pitches within 24-48 hours of the webinar.

By contrast, the “call us if you want this report” method is, in effect, an opt-in move, me to them, at a time of my choosing. If not into the Wildfire marketing funnel, then at least it arguably advances the trust factor while giving Wildfire knowledge about which people are really interested in the information, helping them subset the attendees to the webinar into a more promising list.

You know me – naturally, I asked about this as a conversion strategy.

The man on the phone described it as a “What you make of it” opportunity, which I took to mean that it was okay if someone just wanted to give their email no questions asked. But he was also available to answer questions about Wildfire’s products and services.

More to the point — it kept the contact moving forward.

The phone call prompted a second nearly immediate email, this time personalized (Dear Robin), with an engaging subject line (“As promised…”) and a specific person at WIldfire (firstname.lastname@wildfireapp.com)

In addition to the PDF of the full report, that email offered a second opportunity to learn more about Wildfire – listing out the firm’s value add for clients.

Maybe sometime in the future, Wildfire will hold a Call Don’t Click Conversion Case Study webinar. I would love to know the stats on success. I’m guessing they’re a lot higher than PRWeb’s 2012 nearly-cold calling idea.

What do you think?

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